2 December, 2021

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Can My Dog Eat Mango?

Can My Dog Eat Mango?

Can My Dog Eat Mango?

The mango is a yellow, sweet, and delectable fruit that is popular to eat during summer. It’s great as a beverage, dessert, on salads, and just as is. It doesn’t end there; it’s also packed with vitamins, minerals, and fiber. This fruit is available in stores almost all-year-round, so you can enjoy and reap what it has to offer. 

It’s not just us who can enjoy this fruit—even our furry companions can. You may be encouraged by your pet’s puppy eyes to share a tasty mango with them, but you have to ask yourself first: “Can my dog eat mangoes?”

Can My Dog Eat Mango?

The short answer is yes; your dog can eat mangoes. Not all parts of the mango are safe for them (or even people), though.

Can Dogs Have Mango?

Mangoes are safe for dogs to eat, provided they only eat the yellow flesh of the mango.

Other parts of the mango, like the seeds and the peel, are too dangerous for your canine to consume.

Are Mangoes Good for Dogs?

Mangoes are known to be a low calorie, high nutrient fruit. That means your dog can enjoy mangoes as an irregular treat that does not spike their calorie intake. At the same time, they reap the vitamins and minerals of the mango. 

Are Mangoes Bad for Dogs?

No, mangoes aren’t bad for SOME dogs. Just like us, some can eat mangoes while others experience adverse effects like diarrhea or upset stomach.  

When Are Mangoes Bad for Dogs?

The downside of mangoes is that a large percentage of calories in mangoes come from organic sugars. The sugar content in mangoes is mostly sucrose, commonly known as white table sugar, while the other part is fructose and dextrose. Thus, it has a much higher sugar content than most sultry fruits.

This means that feeding your dog too many mangoes regularly can cause weight gain, diabetes, and dental issues.

Possible Dangers of Eating Mango

Mangoes are stone fruits, meaning they have a pit within the fruit that’s dangerous for your dog. 

The pit inside the fibrous seed contains cyanide, a toxic substance that can poison your dog. Chewing or ingesting broken pits poses a risk of consuming cyanide. 

Aside from the pit, the peel is also hazardous. The peel contains fiber, which can cause your dog to bloat if ingested in large amounts. And even if you cut the peel into smaller pieces, it’s not as soft as the flesh and is harder to digest. On the same note, the peel is also a choking hazard. 

What Do I Do If My Dog Eats a Seed/Pit?

Immediately call for your nearest vet. A dog swallowing a seed, regardless of size, is a serious emergency. Not only can it cause a blockage in their intestinal tract, but it can also poison your dog since the inner pits contain cyanide.

Acute cyanide toxicity is a cause for alarm. Although extremely uncommon, you should always consider it if symptoms like vomiting, salivating, difficult breathing, and bright red gums occur.

Can My Dog Eat Dried Mangoes?

The main difference between dried fruit and raw, untampered mangoes is the water content. Dried fruit is the dehydrated version of raw fruit. Aside from that obvious fact, the sugar content has also become more noticeable and concentrated. 

Concentrated sugar makes the fruit far sweeter than it was originally, making it now unsafe to give it to your dog, even as a treat. 

Too much sugar can lead to diabetes, obesity, and even tooth decay.

So it’s best to avoid giving your dog dried mangoes, or any kind of dried fruit for that matter.

Can My Dog Eat the Mango Peel?

The mango peel is a highly fibrous part of the mango. Fiber is known to aid in digestion, but not in large amounts.

The mango peel’s texture is harder than that of the flesh, making it difficult to chew, swallow, and digest. It may even cause a blockage in the intestines. 

Dogs cannot have too much fiber since their stomach cannot handle it. Excess fiber can cause gastrointestinal upset, possible diarrhea, and bloating. 

In conclusion, your canine is far better off eating the flesh instead.

Does Mango Have Any Nutritional Value for Dogs?

The mango is a low-calorie yet high-fiber stone fruit packed with vitamins A, C, and E. It also contains iron, zinc, and antioxidants. 

These antioxidants include gallotannin and mangiferin. Mangiferin is known as a “super antioxidant” known to aid in battling free radicals, wounds, and cell damage.

Can Mango Treat Any Problems in Dogs?

No such findings have been known to support mangoes as a treatment for any medical or dental problem. They’re regarded as a treat, given only occasionally.

Benefits of Mango for Dogs

Mangoes offer a ton of health benefits to dogs. 

They contain antioxidants, and one of these antioxidants is called mangiferin. Mangiferin is a “super antioxidant” that helps fight free radicals, injuries, and cell damage. 

Vitamins C and E promote good gut health and aid in strengthening the immune system. 

And vitamin A is known to support eye and bone health.

How Much Mango Can My Dog Eat?

Your dog doesn’t really need a lot of sugar since it can lead to health issues. So, a healthy amount like a tablespoon twice a week is safe when feeding smaller breeds.

Nothing can be any safer than checking in with your vet first, though. They’ll provide you with instructions regarding the frequency and amount of mangoes your dog can have.

How to Serve Mango to Dogs?

You must slice mangoes into smaller chunks to prevent choking and promote easier digestion. 

This fruit can also be eaten frozen or as is. Frozen mangoes are a great treat for your pooch to enjoy during hot days.

References

Can Dogs Eat Mango? | Purina® Canada

Can Dogs Eat Mango? Are Mangoes Good For Dogs? (akc.org)

Can Dogs Eat Mango? A Complete Guide To Mango For Dogs (thehappypuppysite.com)

Human Foods That Are Toxic to Dogs (thesprucepets.com)

Plant poisoning: cyanide in dogs | Vetlexicon Canis from Vetstream | Definitive Veterinary Intelligence

Mango: Nutrition, Health Benefits and How to Eat It (healthline.com) Can Dogs Eat Mangos? – We’re All About Pets Miriam (2020)

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